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Receptive Language

Distance Learning, Expressive Language, Problem Solving, Receptive Language, Social Skills

How to Use Interactive PDF Resources in Speech Therapy

If you’re like me and diving headfirst into teletherapy or just want to simply incorporate more digital materials and save some trees you might be feeling a little overwhelmed. Learning how to use interactive PDF resources in speech therapy doesn’t have to be overwhelming though.

I’ve recently learned that there are two types of PDFs (portable document format) one is called a static PDF and the other one is called an interactive PDF.

Answering Questions, Receptive Language

108 Free Speech Therapy Wh Questions Printable

According to Kindy News the average child asks about 288 questions a day. That’s A LOT of questions. Kids ask questions to learn about their world and how things work. The typical question begins with a wh question word including simple who questions, what questions, when, where, why questions speech therapy, and how). Grab your wh questions for speech therapy to start practicing today.

Most kids begin asking what questions around the age of two in order to learn about an object, action, or idea.

Listening, Problem Solving, Secondary Life Skills

5 Steps to Self-Advocacy in the Community [Life Skills]

Self-advocacy is the ability to speak up for yourself or on the behalf of someone else or for a cause. It is also the ability to know your rights and responsibilities and to reach out to others when you need help or support. When you self-advocate you have the ability to be assertive as well as negotiate for one’s self, others, or for a cause.

Teaching our students to self-advocate during community outings is an important skill to get their needs met.

Listening, Receptive Language

The Ultimate Whole Body Listening Worksheets and Guide

How many times a day do you find yourself saying such things as “listen carefully” or “pay attention”? It is these requests that we give our students on a daily basis. However, many times we have yet to actually stop and explain to the child our expectations to these requests. When a student doesn’t follow our expectations we often feel frustrated or annoyed and assume they aren’t being a good listener when in reality they may not know you want them to stop fidgeting with their hands, or to make more eye contact to show with their body that they are actively listening. We have to teach whole body listening.